Posts Tagged 'JSF'

How to Start the JSF Dance

Last week our project structure changed a bit and I had to think about training new members in the JSF field. I remembered that there’s still a draft article, I started in 2006, in my blog management. Rick from DZone told me that there’s still a need for giving some tips in JSF programming. So, I polished my article ;-).

Hint: If you still think about changing from your current Web presentation framework to something new, keep in mind that More

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Spring 2.5 – It’s Time For Annotation Driven Injection

Wow, the Spring guys are fast. The Spring Core gets a 2.5 and some other sub projects are ready for productive use:

Spring 2.5 allows a standardized and JDK 6 compliant use of annotations. So, annotation driven injection can be done. InfoQ has started a series of articles about this and other features. Rod has published some slides about Spring Configuration through annotations, etc. He has also updated his More

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JSF on Spring Beans

Some time ago I wrote about how to use backing beans in mixed dependency injection environments. The blog entry describes how to write POJOs in JSF and Spring and use these in a JSF-based presentation. But, the configuration of the Web container is still missing.

Configuration

The configuration is very simple. We need a special listener, RequestContextListener, and a resolver, DelegatingVariableResolver, both from the Spring distribution, to do some “dispatching” when a backing bean identifier has to be mapped to a ...

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Flash or Pure Web Programming to Skip JSF or Struts?

I’m working with different JSF frameworks for some time now and had a look back to the Struts-based Common-Controls recently.

My last hands-on on Struts was in 2003. So, I can’t remember in detail if I had a good or bad feeling about using it. I remember that I chose it to get faster results. The learning curve was quite steep. But, reconsidering the time-frame I had the result was ok to me.

Todays JSF experiences in mind it was ...

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When There’s Bad Smell in Your JSF Tag Soup Due to Facelets

Facelets are an add-on you can use to get templating into your JSF development. It supports the JSF Reference Implementation and also MyFaces. So, the most JSF implementations can use it out-of-the-box.

To use additional tags you get with Trinidad, Tomahawk, Woodstock and the like you need additional taglibs you add to your Facelets configuration. Trinidad has build-in-support, Woodstock and Tomahawk need additional xml files as part of your deployment. Here’s an example for Tomahawk from the web.xml ...

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Guys, Stop Telling me NetBeans is Cooler!

I had another look at NetBeans 5.5, incl. the Enterprise and Visual Web Packs, as some comments suggested. Although, the comparison of a full-blown NetBeans with a standard Eclipse WTP is a bit unfair, I don’t use e.g. myEclipse, I tried to compare apples and oranges.

Well, for short: if you worked with Eclipse for some time you feel like driving your car with an active emergency brake. Most annoying, the Netbeans IDE stops for seconds from time to time ...

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JSF by the JBoss with the Red Hat

If you develop with JSF products you should try to get rid of “tag-based” and get something “visual”. JSF is component-based and similar to the good old GUI development, a lot of us did a decade ago with Delphi, Visual Basic and the like.

If you have a look at OpenSource and cost-free products, there’s not much you can call “visual development”. New in this circle of cost-free wannabes is Exadel Studio Pro.

I already had a look at their standard ...

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Why you should prefer JSF over Spring-MVC?

Although, I’m a fan of the Spring Framework it’s not in any case the best you can get. Meanwhile, there’s a lot of stuff in it. But, limited resources and parallel developments in the community, to improve certain aspects of the Java/JEE platform, led to parts in Spring that should be skipped or further developed before used.

One of these aspects in Spring is Spring-MVC. From the historical point of view it helps to get rid of cumbersome JSP coding, like ...

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Nightmares on JSF Street in Trinidad

JavaServer Faces (JSF) is the upcoming standard for the presentation layer of enterprise architectures. It’s going to replace the good old Struts. Struts, being the first widely accepted MVC 2 framework, to separate presentation from business logic, JSF now adds a real component model, event handling, validation and more to it. JSF can be compared to GUI development, although it doesn’t result in a single standalone client-side application, but in a bunch of code for the app ...

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The Observer Pattern in Mixed Dependency Injection Contexts (Spring, JSF)

One of the most well-known patterns is the Observer pattern, well described in the Gang of Four (GoF) book. It allows to separate the application logic from the view(s) (if you have the focus on MVC implementations) or simply implements a notification mechanism that allows to update objects if others change their state (publisher – subscriber implementations).

Basically, the Observer pattern describes object dependencies. So, it’s a good idea to use an environment that allows to implement it with ...

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